Willem van de Velde oil painting

100% hand painted with oils on canvas after museum original

Item No.
OP1470

Period:
Baroque

$249.00

Secured and trusted checkout with

Willem van de Velde oil painting 100% handamde reproduction. Willem van de Velde the Elder (c. 1611 - 13 December 1693) was a Dutch Golden Age seascape painter. Willem van de Velde, known as the Elder, a marine draughtsman and painter, was born in Leiden, the son of a Flemish skipper, Willem Willemsz. van de Velde, and is commonly said to have been bred to the sea. In 1706 Bainbrigg Buckeridge noted that he "understood navigation very well". He married Judith Adriaensdochter van Leeuwen in Leiden, the Netherlands, in 1631. His three known legitimate children were named Magdalena, born 1632; Willem, known as the Younger, also a marine painter, born 1633; and Adriaen, a landscape painter, born 1636. His marriage was stormy, at least in its later years. David Cordingly relates that Willem the Elder fathered two children out of wedlock in 1653, one "by his maidservant, and the other by her friend. Nine years later the Elder and his wife went through a legal separation, 'on account of legal disputes and the most violent quarrels'. The immediate cause of the dispute was his affair with a married woman." Michael S. Robinson noted that "on 17/27 July 1662, he and his wife agreed to part. A condition of the separation was that the Elder could recover from his son Adriaen 'two royal gifts', presumably gifts from Charles II for work done in England." Cordingly's account further relates that the dispute was still continuing after another ten years, since "in the autumn of 1672 Judith complained to the woman's husband." Robinson adds that by 1674 the couple "must have been reconciled", for at a chance meeting with Pieter Blaeu in Amsterdam in July the Elder explained that he was only visiting for a few days "in order to fetch his wife". His son, Adriaen, had died in Amsterdam in 1672, and Willem the Elder was also fetching his grandson, similarly named Adriaen, who was then aged two. After his move to England, the exact date of which is uncertain, but reportedly at the end of 1672 or beginning of 1673, he is said to have lived with his family in East Lane, Greenwich, and to have used the Queen's House, now part of the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, as a studio. Following the accession of William and Mary as King and Queen of England, it appears that this facility was no longer provided, and by 1691 he was living in Sackville Street, now close to Piccadilly Circus. He died in London, and was buried in St James's Church, at the south end of the street. Willem van de Velde the Younger (bapt. 18 December 1633 - 6 April 1707) was a Dutch marine painter. Willem van de Velde was baptised on 18 December 1633 in Leiden, Holland, Dutch Republic. A son of Willem van de Velde the Elder, also a painter of sea-pieces, Willem van de Velde, the younger, was instructed by his father, and afterwards by Simon de Vlieger, a marine painter of repute at the time, and had achieved great celebrity by his art before he came to London. In 1673 he moved to England, where he was engaged by Charles II, at a salary of £100, to aid his father in "taking and making draughts of sea-fights", his part of the work being to reproduce in color the drawings of the elder van de Velde. He was also patronized by the Duke of York and by various members of the nobility. He died on 6 April 1707 in London, England. Most of Van de Velde's finest works represent views off the coast of Holland, with Dutch shipping. His best productions are delicate, spirited and finished in handling, and correct in the drawing of the vessels and their rigging. The numerous figures are tellingly introduced, and the artist is successful in his renderings of sea, whether in calm or storm. The ships are portrayed with almost photographic accuracy, and are the most precise guides available to the appearance of 17th-century ships. There are a number of van de Velde's marine paintings in the Wallace Collection, London, including "The Embarkation of King Charles II at Scheveningen, 1660".
Available sizes and prices: size 1. 16" x 20" (40 x 50 cm) $189 size 2. 20" x 24" (50 x 60 cm) $199 size 3. 24" x 30" (60 x 75 cm) $249 size 4. 24" x 36" (60 x 90 cm) $299 size 5. 30" x 40" (75 x 100 cm) $349 size 6. 36" x 48" (90 x 120 cm) $449 size 7. 48" x 60" (120 x 150 cm) $599 size 8. 48" x 72" (120 x 180 cm) $699 size 9. 60" x 72" (150 x 180 cm) $799 Custom sizes: we can paint any size, contact us for a price quote if your desired size is not listed above.

Hand painted with oils on canvas after museum original. Our oil paintings are 100% real hand-painted paintings, on real thick canvas with real and finest quality oil paints. We do not use prints or computer generated manipulation when creating our paintings, each artwork is painted on a blank canvas from scratch. Our experienced artists paint in the same way the original paintings were created with visible textures and brush strokes. Please visit our "Completed Paintings" to see side by side examples of our reproductions next to the originals. For more details please refer to our "Oil Paintings Reproductions FAQ".
PayPal, VISA, MC, AmEx, Google Checkout, checks, bank transfers accepted
Please allow 30-45 days for delivery. Shipping is $0, free to any country worldwide.
Item is returnable within 7 days for money back guarantee minus 20% restocking fee, provided it is returned undamaged in original condition and packaging