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Young Greek Athlete of Sicyon Statue Sculpture

Made of Bonded Bronze (cold cast)
Dimensions: 12.5" (32 cm)
Item No. A0020
Period: Greek Age (7th-4th century B.C.)
This Item is an Identical Museum Reproduction

$749.00

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Description

Young Greek Athlete of Sicyon Statue Sculpture attributed to Polykleitos 440 BC, contemporary of Phidias and Myron. Original: National Museum of Athens. Polykleitos (or Polyklitos, Polycleitus, Polyclitus; Greek ???????????); called the Elder,[1] was a Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth and the early 4th century BCE. Next to Phidias, Myron and Kresilas, he is considered the most important sculptor of Classical antiquity: the 4th-century catalogue attributed to Xenocrates (the “Xenocratic catalogue”), which was Pliny’s guide in matters of art, ranked him between Phidias and Myron.[2] He was of the school of Argos and a contemporary of Phidias (possibly also taught by Ageladas). His figure of an Amazon for Ephesus was regarded as superior to those by Phidias and Kresilas at the same time[citation needed]; and his colossal gold and ivory statue of Hera which stood in her temple – the Heraion of Argos – was compared with the Zeus by Phidias. He also sculpted a famous bronze male nude known as the Doryphoros (“Spear-carrier”), which survives in the form of numerous Roman marble copies. Further sculptures attributed to Polykleitos[citation needed] are the Discophoros (“Discus-bearer”), Diadumenos (“Diadem-wearer”) and a Hermes at one time placed, according to Pliny, in Lysimachia (Thrace). Polykleitos’ Astragalizontes (“Boys Playing at Knuckle-bones”) was claimed by the Emperor Titus and set in a place of honour in his atrium.[3] Polykleitos, along with Phidias, created the Classical Greek style. Although none of his original works survive, literary sources identifying Roman marble copies of his work allow reconstructions to be made. Contrapposto was a posture in his statues in which the weight was placed on one leg, and was a source of his fame.

What is the difference between 100% solid bronze (lost wax cast) and Bonded Bronze (cold cast)? Our bronze sculptures are made either in Cold Cast Bronze or Hot Cast Bronze (lost wax bronze), or both. Cold Cast Bronze and Hot Cast Bronze and two different methods of creating bronze objects. 1) Hot-Cast Bronze is actually Bronze - essentially copper and tin. The making of a Hot-Cast Bronze is a complex and time consuming process, and specific technical expertise is needed to accomplish the task of making a bronze. The most known and used process for making sculpture is called the "Lost Wax" Process, and involves pouring of molten bronze. Our larger sculptures are made of Hot-Cast or lost wax bronze. 2) Cold-Cast Bronze, also referred to as "bonded bronze," is a product made from resin mixed/blended with 100% pure bronze powder to give it the appearance of the true bronze. It looks just as a hot-cast bronze object does - both are bronzes. Some of our smaller sculptures are made of cold cast bronze. The cost for making a hot-cast bronze statue is much greater than that of a cold-cast bronze statue. A sculpture made of hot-cast bronze would be several times more expensive then made in cold cast bronze. Yet in either of the above materials, the casts (the final product made out of the mold) are made using the same rubber mold; which is taken from the original sculpture. Thus, the final result is exactly the same bronze sculpture, only made in a different bronze material. With the cold cast we still achieve the same bronze effect at much lower cost and thus is more affordable.
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